OPEN TOPONYM

Kat Chamberlin, Kelly Dzioba, and Esther Ruiz

August 3, 2019 - September 7, 2019

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When you step out and look through the grid of city lights at the moon, what do you feel? You are a dot on a dot, forever rotating. The big white globe shines back at you. It is its own entity, and so are you. Can you perceive the craters on its reverse side? Cartographer Kira Shingareva gave these craters a place in space. She wanted to name them after artists and poets but compromised with the Soviet Union to name them after scientists and engineers instead. There are places that are never seen by the human eye, always just out of sight. Out of site. By naming the craters, did Shingareva bring them into existence? Is she gone, or is she mapped onto their surfaces?

The systems that help us organize and discover hidden places take on forms of their own. The artists in Open Toponym explore these forms, reaching beyond what we see to map the far side. They deconstruct and reconfigure to explore self, space, and sound. They ask the viewer to reevaluate the space they inhabit and manipulate. They embrace the mystery of the final form. They chase the orbiting dot.